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1 - 3 of 3 Results

  • / Technology

    How Goldspeed.com races to keep ahead of online thieves

    Thieves don’t just use the Internet to place orders and hide behind the web’s anonymity – they also go online to post information on security holes at retailers, says Goldspeed.com CEO Neil Kugelman.

    Posted 06/28/2007Paul DemeryPost a comment

    Thieves don’t just use the Internet to place orders and hide behind the web’s anonymity – they also go online to post information on security holes at retailers, says Goldspeed.com CEO Neil Kugelman.
  • / Technology

    Criminals’ use of web phone service rings trouble for online retailers

    Criminals’ use of anonymous IP addresses backed by Internet-based phone numbers is making it more difficult to identify potentially fraudulent orders, Ice.com security chief Ezzie Schaff says. But special software can keep the bad guys in check, he adds.

    Posted 12/14/2006Paul DemeryPost a comment

    Criminals’ use of anonymous IP addresses backed by Internet-based phone numbers is making it more difficult to identify potentially fraudulent orders, Ice.com security chief Ezzie Schaff says. But special software can keep the bad guys in check, he adds.
  • / Technology

    Doubleclick Gives In, Changes Policy

    Bowing to pressure from consumer advocacy groups, the Federal Trade Commission and government officials, DoubleClick announced that it would no longer place tracking cookies on consumers' computers without their permission. DoubleClick CEO Kevin O'Connor admitted in a statement on its Web site that he, "Made a mistake by planning to merge names with anonymous user activity across Web sites in the absence of government and industry privacy...

    Posted 01/19/2001Don DavisPost a comment

    Bowing to pressure from consumer advocacy groups, the Federal Trade Commission and government officials, DoubleClick announced that it would no longer place tracking cookies on consumers' computers without their permission. DoubleClick CEO Kevin O'Connor admitted in a statement on its Web site that…

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