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1 - 6 of 6 Results

  • / Technology

    Consumers will give personal info to get something in return, study finds

    The prospect of getting usable product recommendations in return makes consumers up to 25% more likely than usual to provide personal information to a marketer, says a new survey from R.R. Donnelley and Sons Co.

    Posted 08/29/2003Paul DemeryPost a comment

    The prospect of getting usable product recommendations in return makes consumers up to 25% more likely than usual to provide personal information to a marketer, says a new survey from R.R. Donnelley and Sons Co.
  • / Technology

    More customers are concerned about their privacy, Harris poll reports

    The number of consumers who are unconcerned about privacy and their personal data has dropped from 22% in 1999 to only 10% today, says Harris Interactive. The number who will give up personal information in return for a benefit has grown from 54% to 64%.

    Posted 03/20/2003Kurt PetersPost a comment

    The number of consumers who are unconcerned about privacy and their personal data has dropped from 22% in 1999 to only 10% today, says Harris Interactive. The number who will give up personal information in return for a benefit has grown from 54% to 64%.
  • / Technology

    Consumers are concerned about online privacy, but few understand it

    70% of consumers express concern about their privacy online, but only 40% read privacy statements before giving personal information.

    Posted 06/04/2002Internet RetailerPost a comment

    70% of consumers express concern about their privacy online, but only 40% read privacy statements before giving personal information.
  • / Technology

    Survey Finds Online Privacy "Gap"

    Ninety percent of online marketers say self-regulation is adequately protecting the privacy rights of consumers at their own companies -- but only 46% believe it's working for the industry in general. And that's not the only "privacy gap" highlighted by a new survey from Palo Alto, Calif.-based Responsys.com, a provider of online direct marketing solutions. Of 352 online marketers surveyed, almost half believe that consumers feel their online...

    Posted 01/19/2001Don DavisPost a comment

    Ninety percent of online marketers say self-regulation is adequately protecting the privacy rights of consumers at their own companies -- but only 46% believe it's working for the industry in general. And that's not the only "privacy gap" highlighted by a new survey from Palo Alto, Calif.-based…
  • / Marketing

    Privacy gets the sale

    To be successful online, businesses must provide the personalized service that Web shoppers want and take steps to ensure privacy and security, according to a new (www.ibm.com/services) IBM Corp. survey on consumer privacy attitudes in the U.S., the U.K. and Germany. The IBM Multi-National Consumer Privacy Study underscores consumer interest in online privacy protection, says IBM. The report also suggests businesses with good privacy policies and...

    Posted 01/19/2001Don DavisPost a comment

    To be successful online, businesses must provide the personalized service that Web shoppers want and take steps to ensure privacy and security, according to a new (www.ibm.com/services) IBM Corp. survey on consumer privacy attitudes in the U.S., the U.K. and Germany. The IBM Multi-National Consumer…
  • For Whose Eyes Only

    To understand how far Internet privacy has climbed on the agendas of e-retailers, consider that Garden.com recently tripled the size of its “privacy pledge,” detailing in three pages, instead of one, how it collects and uses customer information. “We wanted to make sure that it was as clear as possible that we do not gather any information that customers are unaware of,” says Wendy Carter, marketing manager of the Austin, Texas-based site. “It is...

    Posted 12/26/2000Don DavisPost a comment

    To understand how far Internet privacy has climbed on the agendas of e-retailers, consider that Garden.com recently tripled the size of its “privacy pledge,” detailing in three pages, instead of one, how it collects and uses customer information. “We wanted to make sure that it was as clear…

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